» Gov. Buddy Roemer Goes Independent

I’d be lying if I said that I wasn’t tempted to cast a protest vote …

“Tomorrow, I will formally end my bid for the GOP nomination for President of the United States. As the GOP and the networks host debate number twenty-something this evening, they have once again turned their backs on the democratic process by choosing to exclude a former Governor and Congressman. I have decided to take my campaign directly to the American people by declaring my candidacy for Americans Elect. Also, after many discussions with The Reform Party, I am excited to announce my intentions of seeking their nomination. It is time to heal our nation and build a coalition of Americans who are fed up with the status quo and the partisan gridlock that infects Washington. Together, we will take on the special-interests that control our leaders and end the corruptive influence of money in politics so we can focus on America’s top priority – jobs.”

I don’t think I agree with Buddy on issues much more than I do with the current administration. But knowing that Texas isn’t likely to be competitive (suggestive polling notwithstanding) and a previous affinity to Roemer from his days as a Congressman and Governor might be enough to swing a sentimental vote his way. The fact that he still cares about campaign finance and has managed to generally hold true to his old self without trying to out-crazy the rest of the GOP pack is also a plus.

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2 thoughts on “Roemer Bolts for Another Political Party … Again

  1. Greg, I can appreciate your sentimental affinities for good ol’ Buddy, but you must call him out for his line about how the GOP and the networks “have once again turned their backs on the democratic process by choosing to exclude a former Governor and Congressman” from the debate stage.

    We should have a problem if an individual can appeal only to his “stature” as a former officeholder to place him on the Presidential debate stage. It is with good reason that the networks or political parties place some limits on who they include — with a provision that a candidate must be polling at least a modicum of support among the citizenry.

    So Buddy shouldn’t be blaming the GOP or the networks for his failure to generate sufficient buzz in the electorate.

  2. He’s not without some ability to be self-serving. Its definitely a trait that had a bit more nuance before 1992 than it does today. One of the luxuries of maintaining some affinity for him is know that I never have to worry about him winning an election. It also helps me look past his protectionist views on trade and a few other significant issues where I disagree with him.

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